Early call of springtime

No matter where we live in the earth’s northern hemisphere, this time of year begins to present the first celestial clues that spring is in fact, on its way.

Around 9 PM  or so during the next couple of weeks head outdoors and cast your gaze  low in the eastern sky. Here you’ll see one of the most famous springtime indicators in the northern hemisphere, the constellation Leo. Leo is one of few constellations that, with some imagination, actually can be made to look like its namesake--- a lion crouching in a regal pose reminiscent of the enigmatic Egyptian Sphinx.


Most prominent in this constellation is the bright star Regulus, which shines brightly beneath the lions majestic head and mane, marked by a large sickle-shaped grouping of stars. More metropolitan stargazers may recognize this figure not as a sickle but as a backwards question mark, with Regulus forming the period at its base.


At the other end of the lion we find the bright star Denebola whose name originates from the Arabic “Al Dhanabal Asad.” Meaning “the lions tail.”


Excerpt from Newsday, Author :Dennis Mammana,    Submitted by Don Clancy



 

Early call of springtime

No matter where we live in the earth’s northern hemisphere, this time of year begins to present the first celestial clues that spring is in fact, on its way.

Around 9 PM  or so during the next couple of weeks head outdoors and cast your gaze  low in the eastern sky. Here you’ll see one of the most famous springtime indicators in the northern hemisphere, the constellation Leo. Leo is one of few constellations that, with some imagination, actually can be made to look like its namesake--- a lion crouching in a regal pose reminiscent of the enigmatic Egyptian Sphinx.

   

 

 

Most prominent in this constellation is the bright star Regulus, which shines brightly beneath the lions majestic head and mane, marked by a large sickle-shaped grouping of stars. More metropolitan stargazers may recognize this figure not as a sickle but as a backwards question mark, with Regulus forming the period at its base.

At the other end of the lion we find the bright star Denebola whose name originates from the Arabic “Al Dhanabal Asad.” Meaning “the lions tail.”

 

 Excerpt from Newsday, Author :Dennis Mammana,    Submitted by Don Clancy